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Archive for April 12th, 2010

Meatless Mondays… and Tuesdays and then the rest of the work week is just WTF [literally], so why eat meat at all?  Clearly, we have already made the leap and adopted an entirely vegan lifestyle, but the reality that is dawning upon me is that I don’t think most people realize that there are food options outside of meat-centered meals.  That is why we have decided to jump aboard the Meatless Monday bandwagon and help contribute to its success and awareness to affect change.

I am a firm proponent of taking control of what you eat.  Personally, I don’t want industrially-processed substances that have been purposefully treated with chemicals engineered specifically in order to ring all the bells and blow all the whistles of human sensory organs.  It is manipulation, and it is wrong.  If Americans knew what it is that they actually eat and regard as food, they would be horrified.  At least I hope they would be; we certainly were/are.

Regardless of the ethics of the matter, Americans consume far too much meat.  It is affecting our environment and our collective health as a nation.  When elective surgical procedures that rearrange one’s digestive system become the norm,  yet eating five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables daily is considered extreme, something has clearly gone diabolically wrong.  It is time to step up and accept responsibility for ourselves and to take a good long look at how our actions and whims affect our health and our planet.  The least anyone could do is to abstain from consuming an animal one day of the week.  Please, spread the word and encourage those you know to support Meatless Monday.  Awareness coupled with action is a powerful thing.

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Yuba Asada

Yuba is also referred to as dried bean curd or dried bean curd sticks.  You can also sometimes find it as bean curd knots, which are very nice to use.  It is easily found in an Asian market and is worth the side-trip to have some on hand.

Ingredients:

1 package yuba, rehydrated in warm water until soft and then cut into 1/4 inch shreds [If you have knots rather than sticks, there is no need to cut, simply use whole.]

Juice and zest of one lemon, lime, orange and grapefruit

2 T cumin

2 T chili powder

1½ tsp dried oregano

1½ tsp ground coriander

5 garlic cloves, crushed

¼ cup soy sauce

2 jalapenos or one habanero [If you like it hotter], seeds and ribs removed and sliced thinly

1 onion, thinly sliced

Directions:

Place all ingredients into a zip lock bag or other container and add the yuba. [I prefer a bag because it’s easy to move the ingredients around occasionally to ensure it’s well marinaded.]

The following day, drain off the liquid in a colander.  Heat a bit of canola oil over medium –high heat and add the yuba asada.  Stir-fry until the liquid has evaporated and the yuba begins to brown.

Serve with black beans, pan-fried potatoes and some warmed corn tortillas.  Garnish with fresh cilantro, avocado, tomatoes and roasted garlic cloves.

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