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Archive for the ‘Mushroom’ Category

This dish was an awesome pairing of two of our favorite seasonal offerings:  asparagus and morel mushrooms.  I’ve found that roasting [rather than steaming] asparagus takes this already sublime stalk to its ultimate level of tastiness as those natural sugars caramelize and the tips slightly crisp.  I figured that if I then smothered that roasted asparagus in some earthy mushrooms, cooked in a tartly sweet and creamy balsamic sauce, and then further wrapped it all up into a calzone that had been spread with a lemony cashew “cheese”, it might just delight H.  Phew…what a mouthful; and it was!  I was right, but I had a pretty good hunch going in that this would be a winner.

This recipe yielded 4 calzones.

 

Creamy Balsamic Morels

Ingredients:

½ cup diced shallot

2 large cloves garlic, minced

2 oz mushrooms, diced [I used morels; you could use whichever mushroom you enjoy most.]

1 T olive oil

2 T balsamic vinegar

1/3 cup plain non-dairy yogurt [I used So Delicious Plain Coconut Yogurt]

Directions:

Add olive oil to a pan over medium heat.  Sauté the shallots and garlic until translucent.  Add the morels and sauté until softened.  Add the balsamic vinegar and cook until the mushrooms have absorbed the liquid.  Add the yogurt and mix well.  Remove from heat and set aside.

Lemony Cashew “Cheese”

Ingredients:

½ cup cashews, soaked for one hour

1 tsp lemon zest

1 T lemon juice

Directions:

Drain the cashews and place in a food processor.  Add the lemon zest and juice.  Pulse until a paste forms.

12 roasted asparagus spears [Toss in olive oil and roast at 450°F until they start to caramelize ~10-15 mins.]

One large pizza dough at room temperature [I buy this at my local grocery; your local pizzeria would probably sell you a ball of pizza dough]

***

Assembling the Calzone:

Preheat the oven to 425°F. [Also preheat your pizza stone or sheet pan.]

Divide the dough into 4 portions.  Stretch each into a small pizza-sized round.  Add ¼ of the cashew cheese to ½ of each round.  Lay 3 spears of asparagus [trimmed to fit] atop the cashew cheese.  Add ¼ of the creamy balsamic mushrooms.  Fold the top of the pizza round over the bottom and seal the edges by crimping and rolling over as you make your way around the semi-circle [as you would a pie crust].  Using a knife make a couple of vent holes on the top to allow steam to release as they cook.  You can also brush the surface with some olive oil.

Place upon a pre-heated pizza stone or sheet pan.  Bake until golden.

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I have fallen in love with Tofu Shirataki noodles.  They’re packed full of fiber and calcium and have such a low calorie count they are almost an afterthought.  I’ve been using them lately in everything and wanted to spread the word to those of you who may be looking for interesting and less caloric pasta choices.  They have a somewhat squidgy texture, but they’re soft unlike kelp noodles which are crunchy and brittle-textured.  Here I tossed them with some quickly sautéed kale [we have to get in our daily cruciferious fix!], shiitakes and garlic in a really quickly freshened Asian-style sauce.

 

Orange and Mushroom Noodles with Kale

Ingredients:

1 bunch lacinato kale

2 cups sliced shiitake mushroom caps

1 small onion, diced

2 cloves garlic, sliced

½ cup freshly squeezed orange juice, plus the zest of one orange

¼ cup vegetarian oyster sauce [aka mushroom sauce easily found in Asian groceries]

1 – 8 oz package Tofu Shirataki, or noodle of your choice

Directions:

Add a couple teaspoons of neutral oil to a sauté pan and bring to a medium heat.  Add the mushrooms and onion.  Sauté until softened. 

Add the orange juice, zest and vegetarian oyster sauce to a small pan and bring to a low simmer.  Allow this to simmer and reduce slightly while the vegetables cook.

Put a pot of water on to boil to heat the noodles.

Add the garlic and kale to the pan containing the mushrooms and onions.  Once the kale has wilted down [should take about 10 minutes], add the sauce and set aside.

Rinse the noodles under running water and then add to a pot of boiling water.  Boil for 2-3 minutes.  Drain and toss with the vegetables and sauce.

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A little while back, a friend gifted us with an astounding abundance of chanterelle mushrooms and requested a mushroom burger.  I already have a go-to mushroom burger recipe for when I want a substantial and satisfyingly savory burger, so the challenge was to create one that was entirely different and celebrated this more delicately flavored seasonal ‘shroom.

Multigrain Mushroom Burger

Makes ~8 burgers

Ingredients:

2 lb chanterelle mushrooms , chopped

1 cup oat groats, soaked overnight

⅓ cup bulgur wheat

½ cup sliced almonds

⅔ cup millet

1 large leek, sliced thinly

6 cloves garlic, sliced

½ cup dried cherries

¼ cup tarragon

1 red bell pepper, medium dice

2 ½  cups mushroom broth, divided

2 T garbanzo bean flour

½ cup vital wheat gluten

Salt and pepper

Directions:

Bring 2 cups mushroom broth to a simmer and add the bulgur wheat and millet.  Reduce heat and cover until the broth is absorbed fully and the grains are fluffy.

Sauté the mushrooms, leek, garlic and bell pepper in a drizzle of olive oil until softened.

Add the oat groats to a food processor and pulse a few times.   Add the cooked mushroom mixture, dried cherries, almonds and tarragon.  Process until the mixture is well combined and any larger pieces are broken down.  Season with salt and pepper.   Transfer to a large bowl.

Add the garbanzo bean flour and wheat gluten and work through until evenly dispersed.  Form into 8 burger patties.  Cook over medium heat for a few minutes per side.

I garnished this burger with pan-seared apple slices rather than using a faux mayo.

 

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A couple of weeks ago, Jasmin Singer of Our Hen House, and her partner Mariann Sullivan, shared on Facebook that they were going to begin a 10-day juice cleanse because they felt the need to “reboot” their systems.  Jasmin welcomed any and all to join them in the venture.  Over the course of the following few days, the idea intrigued me more and more because I’d never experienced such a thing.  Having always been somewhat curious about fasting/cleansing, I decided that I’d jump in with both feet and commit to the experience.   

It wasn’t as difficult as I’d imagined it would be.  Yes, I missed hot food and the textural quality of meals, but when I reminded myself that I was treating my body to a rich source of exceptionally digestible phytonutrients, thereby giving my digestive system a breather, things just didn’t seem quite so austere.  It also helped my will-power tremendously to know that I wasn’t alone in the undertaking.  The interesting results were that aside from losing five pounds, there were no physical manifestations that I could detect.  That doesn’t necessarily mean that there weren’t any, I just didn’t experience any of the usual detoxification symptoms such as crankiness, headaches, nausea, dizziness, fatigue or skin blemishes.   I suppose that it could be a testament to just how cleanly we have eaten this past year since we cut out all processed foods and animal products.  I know that I certainly feel better since we embarked upon our own food revolution, and I’m quite sure that Heather does as well.

In one of the last video logs of her juice cleanse, Jasmin remarked that she and Mariann would  like to start incorporating more healthy raw foods into their diets.  From my perspective, this was a fabulous thing to hear because it afforded me the opportunity to thank them, in my own particular way, for allowing me to tag along on the journey, and for all the support and community they provided along the way.  Simply because I didn’t manifest any outward symptoms of a cleansing doesn’t mean that I didn’t learn anything from the experience!  And so, Jasmin and Mariann…I raise my fork to you both in gratitude by dedicating the creation of my very first raw entrée to you.  I wish you and yours good health and vast happiness.

 

Raw Asian Mushroom Stroganoff with Blackberries

I purposefully chose the Asian pear, lemon zest and Brussels sprouts to add sweetness, bitterness and a touch of refreshing acidity, respectively, in order to cut through a very rich mushroom sauce which would otherwise become quite monotonous.   [I never could eat an entire plate of Fettuccine Alfredo for this very reason.]   Adding a variety of textures to a dish is also very important to me when considering ingredients.  The Asian pear “noodles” add a softness that is more familiar when thinking of a “noodle” dish than the interestingly crunchy texture of kelp noodles.  I also chose Brussels sprouts because Jasmin mentioned that Mariann was rather fond of them.  If you don’t share this love of the cruciferous, you could easily substitute with thinly sliced endive.

Serves 4-6

Ingredients:

1 bag raw kelp noodles [I used Sea Tangle’s ]

1 cup raw cashews, soaked for at least 2 hours [I put them into a container with water the night before and placed it in the refrigerator]

1 Asian pear, spirally sliced [Alternatively, you could certainly use a vegetable peeler or box shredder to create shreds]

4 Brussels sprouts, cut into a chiffonade

6 dried shiitake mushrooms

2 T ground mushroom powder [I simply took equal parts dried maitake and shiitake mushrooms and ground them into a fine powder using a spice grinder]

2 oz  enoki mushrooms

1 T freshly-squeezed lemon juice

½ tsp lemon zest, plus some for garnish

2 tsp fresh thyme, plus some for garnish

¼ tsp sea salt

⅛ tsp white pepper

1 cup water

1 cup fresh blackberries

crushed red pepper flakes

Directions:

Place the dried shiitake mushrooms into the water and allow to rehydrate for at least 30 minutes.  [You shall be using this soaking water later, so do not discard]  Squeeze out any residual water and reserve.  Remove the stems and then slice into thin strips. 

Drain the cashews and toss into a blender.  Add ¾ cup of the reserved shiitake soaking liquid, lemon juice, lemon zest, thyme, salt and pepper.  Process until smooth.  Add the mushroom powder.  Continue blending until the mixture is silky smooth and creamy. 

Slice the Asian pear into spirals or shreds and place in a bowl containing acidulated water [A good squeeze of lemon juice will do the trick].  Rinse the kelp noodles under cold water to separate.  Place both “noodles “into a colander together and drain well.

Transfer to a large bowl and add the Brussels sprouts, sliced rehydrated shiitakes and enoki mushrooms.  Add as much of the creamy mushroom sauce as you wish and mix well.  [I ended up using a tablespoon per serving]

Garnish with the blackberries, lemon zest, thyme and crushed red pepper.

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Judy, a dear friend of ours, recently gifted us with a sackful of fresh morel mushrooms that her son had harvested from the forest, as well as an arm-load of freshly-harvested garlic from her garden.  Faced with the combination of morels and garlic, and deciding to splurge and make something on the more decadent side of life, I opted for Po’Boys.  H wanted her sandwich on a traditional soft hoagie bun [pictured above], whereas I opted for a whole grain bun [pictured below].  Either way, these little gems resting atop a very garlicky sauce were so good!  Thank you Judy for your kindness, we enjoyed the treat thoroughly.

We added the traditional slices of heirloom tomatoes and butter lettuce to the sandwiches to round them out.

Pan-Fried Morels

Ingredients:

4-5 large Morels per sandwich

1/4 cup brown rice flour

1 T ground flax seed

1 cup water

1 cup Panko bread crumbs

Salt-Free Cajun Seasoning

Directions:

Combine the flax seed with the water in a blender and pulse until foamy.  Pour into a bowl.

Add brown rice flour to a bowl and mix in 0.5 tsp cajun seasoning.

Add panko bread crumbs and 1 T cajun seasoning to a bowl, mix well.

These morels were large in size so I quartered them, otherwise if yours are of a smaller size, I’d halve them.  Toss them lightly in some brown rice flour, shaking off the excess and then dredge them in the flax wash.  Allow excess flax wash to drip off before coating  them with the seasoned panko bread crumbs.   Place into a pan of hot oil.  Cook until browned on both sides.  Salt lightly after transfering to a paper towel-lined plate.

Garlicky Tofu and Olive Oil Aioli

This Aioli is less caloric than the standard.  I used tofu to eliminate a great deal of the fat.

Ingredients:

1/2 block extra firm silken tofu

1/3 cup olive oil

5 garlic cloves [This makes it very garlicky; add less if you would prefer.]

non-dairy milk

juice of 1/2 lemon

1.5 tsp Dijon mustard

sea salt

freshly-cracked black pepper

Directions:

Add the tofu, olive oil, garlic, mustard and lemon juice to a blender.  Pulse until well combined.  Add the non-dairy milk until you acheive the consistency you wish.  Season with salt and pepper.

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Our local farmer’s market has a mushroom vendor with the most beautiful shiitakes, oyster, morel and porcini mushrooms imaginable. 

 

 

Each week, this stall is my first stop before winding my way through the bounty of gorgeous produce.  Garlic spears happened to be in season when I made this soup so I incorporated them into the recipe;  garlic scapes would work nicely as would scallions. 

 

 

Hot and Sour Mushroom and Greens Soup

Ingredients:

1 lb mixed Asian mushrooms [Shitakes and Oyster are what I used]

¼ cup tamari

¼ cup red wine vinegar

1 tsp white pepper

1 quart No Chicken Broth

2 cups shredded leafy greens [I used Kaileen, but kale, mustard, turnip or any other green would work well]

2 Walla Walla spring onions, sliced [1 medium onion, sliced into half and then into half-moon slices would work as well]

¼ cup diced garlic spears [can substitute with a couple sliced garlic cloves and a bunch of sliced scallions]

1 T cornstarch dissolved in ¼ cup cold water

Directions:

Sauté the mushrooms and onions in a bit of neutral oil until they have softened.    Add 2/3 of  the garlic spears [or sliced garlic and scallions] and cook for a couple of minutes longer.  Add in the No Chicken Broth, tamari, red wine vinegar and pepper.  Stir well and bring to a low simmer.  Slowly add in the cornstarch while mixing and bring back to a simmer.  Once thickened, toss in the greens and cover the pot.  Cook until the greens are tender.

Serve while hot.  Garnish with the remaining garlic spears or scallion slices.

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We’re back from our road-trip to Farm Sanctuary [photographs of which are posted on our Facebook page if you’d like to check those out] and were craving Mexican-style food after having seen countless taco trucks and Mexican restaurants in California.   My spin on this taco is way outside the norm, but they were amazingly good both in texture and flavor.

The main taco filling was some peachy chili beans.  We topped them with some grilled Maitake mushrooms, grilled corn cut right off the cob and more caramelized peach wedges.  A sprig of fresh and flowering cilantro from our garden added just the flavor to create a new summertime favorite.  We’ll definitely be having these again while peaches and corn are abundant and seasonal.

 

Peachy Chili Beans

Ingredients:

2-15 oz cans Pinto beans, drained and rinsed

2 peaches, sliced into sixths

1 medium onion, diced

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 T tomato paste

1 T chili powder

2 tsp Mexican oregano

½ tsp sweet paprika

½ tsp cumin

¼ tsp cayenne pepper

1 sprig epazote

2 cups water

coconut oil

salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Grill the peach wedges in a grill pan until they have caramelized grill marks on both sides.  Set aside in a bowl. 

Sauté the onion in a drizzle of coconut oil until softened.  Add the garlic and tomato paste and cook for a couple of minutes.  Add the chili powder, paprika, cayenne, oregano and cumin.  Add the beans, water and epazote.  Cut the grilled peaches into a large dice and add them, and their grilling juices that collected in the bowl to the beans.  Bring to a slow simmer and cook until the liquid has reduced and the beans have a nice thick consistency.  Season with salt and pepper.

 

 

 

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