Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Yuba’ Category

It’s nearly summertime and the farmer’s markets are beginning to burst at the seams with produce! Use whatever vegetables you have on hand in this. Aside from the gorgeous okra I picked up, I added some crisp bell pepper, carrots and green cabbage to give this stir-fry some color and wonderful texture.

Okra and Yuba Stir-Fry

Ingredients:

2 cups dried yuba bowtie knots, rehydrated in warm water

2 cups okra, sliced lengthwise

2 carrots, sliced into coins

1 green bell pepper, cut into bite-sized pieces

1/4 head cabbage, cut into a large dice

4 cloves garlic, sliced

1/2 cup vegetable broth

1/4 cup sake

1/4 cup rice wine vinegar

1/4 cup ponzu sauce, without bonito [could substitute soy sauce or tamari]

1 tsp roasted sesame oil

1 tsp garlic chili paste

cornstarch, divided  [Mix 1 T in 1/2 cup cold water to thicken the sauce.  You shall also need some to dredge the yuba in.]

ground ginger

coconut oil

Directions:

Spoon a little bit of coconut oil into a pan and heat to medium-high.  Drain yuba in a colander and pat dry.  Toss with a small handful of cornstarch seasoned with a bit of ground ginger. Allow excess cornstarch to fall off and add to the hot pan,  Cook until the edges have crisped.  Transfer to a bowl and set aside.

Add another drizzle of oil to the pan, if needed, and stir fry all vegetables except the cabbage.  When the vegetables begin to cook yet are still crisp add in the cabbage.  Stir fry for a few minutes longer then add vegetables to the bowl with the yuba.  Add all the sauce ingredients except the cornstarch to the pan and bring to a simmer.  Add cornstarch a bit at a time until the sauce thickens enough to coat the back of a spoon.

Return yuba and vegetables to the pan and mix well to coat with sauce.  Serve over steaming brown rice.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

 

Mu Shu was always my favorite Chinese dish to order when I was a kid.  There was something special about it because you got to assemble it at the table and slather on the thick, dark and sweetly-rich hoisin sauce.  Thing is, like the machaca,  Mu Shu is traditionally loaded with animal proteins.  Since that just wouldn’t do, I needed to figure out another way to create this classic Chinese dish.  Once again, I turned to yuba because it has that wonderful chewy texture and takes on the flavors of marinades very well. 

Another part of this dish that I wanted to reinvent was the wrapper.  Rather than use a Mandarin pancake, which is simply white flour and water and brings nothing of nutritional value to the plate, I chose to use a supple steamed collard green leaf that is full of iron, calcium and fiber.  I also added red bell pepper to the mix in order to add a healthy dose of vitamin C so that the iron and calcium in the collards would be more readily assimilated.  This meal was fantastic and one that I shall make often.

 

Mu Shu Yuba with Collard Green Wrappers

Serves 4

Ingredients:

1 block regular firm tofu [I used half a block of my homemade tofu]

2 oz dried bean curd sticks [Yuba], rehydrated in warm water and drained

1 large red bell pepper, cut into medium dice

1 large green bell pepper, cut into medium dice

1 cup finely sliced bok choy

6 green onions, sliced thinly

1 cup mung bean sprouts

Juice of ½ a lemon

3 cloves garlic, minced

½ inch fresh ginger, finely diced

2-3 dried wood ear mushrooms, rehydrated and sliced [@ a cup’s worth]

1 T tamari

1 tsp agave syrup

1 tsp dry sherry

1 tsp cornstarch

2 tsp sesame oil

¼ tsp turmeric

Hoisin sauce

2-3 large collard green leaves per person

coconut oil for stir-frying the vegetables and tofu

Directions:

For the Filling:

Cut yuba into thin shreds.  Place in a zip lock bag.  Add the tamari, sherry, half the sesame oil and the cornstarch.  Mix well and marinate at least one hour.

Drizzle a bit of coconut oil into a pan over medium-high heat.  Crumble the tofu into the pan and sprinkle the lemon juice and turmeric over it.  Mix well and cook until slightly browned.  Remove from pan and set aside. 

Add another small drizzle of coconut oil to the pan and add the onions and peppers.  Cook until slightly softened.  Add in the garlic and ginger and sauté for a couple of minutes.  Add in the marinated yuba, wood ear mushrooms and bok choy and cook for a few minutes longer.  Return the tofu to the pan and add the remaining teaspoon of sesame oil.    Add the bean sprouts and mix thoroughly until the entirety is heated through.

For the wrapper:

Cut the large thick part of the stem out of each leaf.  Steam or blanch the leaves until tender [This only takes a few minutes].  Spread hoisin sauce on the leaf and add the Mu Shu filling.  Roll it up and eat!

Read Full Post »

 

Cherries, especially the tart variety,  are receiving a great deal of attention these days in the athletic world due to their ability to mitigate pain after exercise.  This little fruit is packed full of anti-inflammatory anthocyanins as well as the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin which are important to the health of your vision. They are also, interestingly enough,  a good source of the calming antioxidant, melatonin.

I use a great deal of fruit and vegetable juices in my cooking to impart both flavor and nutrients to our food, so when Cheribundi approached us and asked if we’d try out their cherry juice, we eagerly agreed.  This sauce, coupled with the yuba, was savory and sweet, tangy and lip-smacking good.   In short, it had umami.   The slaw, absolutely necessary for any mustardy Carolina-style barbecue-sauced dish, was the perfect fresh and raw accompaniment. 

 

Pulled Yuba in a Cherry Barbecue Sauce with Sesame Slaw

Ingredients:

1 cup tart cherry juice [I used Cheribundi’s Tru Cherry juice.]

½ cup dried sour cherries

¼ cup yellow mustard

¼ cup Dijon mustard

½ cup balsamic vinegar

¼ cup dark brown sugar

3 T tomato paste

1 T Worcestershire sauce

1 tsp chili garlic sauce

1 tsp freshly-cracked black pepper

6 oz dried bean curd sheets [1 package]

Peanut oil

Directions:

Add a drizzle of peanut oil to a pan and heat over medium.  Add the tomato paste and spread around the pan to caramelize and rid the paste of the tinned flavor.  Add the remaining ingredients, except the yuba and dried cherries, and bring to a low simmer.  Cook for at least 15 minutes to allow the flavors to blend.

While the sauce is simmering, soak the sheets of yuba in hot tap water to hydrate.  Once pliable, drain and roll into a tight bundle.  Cut into small shreds across the roll. 

Add the shredded yuba and dried cherries to the sauce.  Mix well to incorporate and set aside to marinate.  The longer you leave it, the more flavor the yuba will absorb.  To serve, simply return to the heat and warm through.  I served this sandwich-style on a toasted ciabatta bun.

 

***

 

Sesame Slaw

Ingredients:

snow pea pods, julienned

red bell pepper, julienned

apple, julienned

golden beet, shaved with a vegetable peeler

tahini

fresh lemon juice and zest

dark sesame oil

black sesame seeds

Directions:

I did not include amounts because it depends upon how much you wish to make.  I simply added equal portions of each fruit and vegetable ingredient and then used a 2:1 ratio of tahini to lemon juice as the dressing with a few drops of dark sesame oil added.  Season with sea salt and freshly-cracked black pepper.  Garnish with sesame seeds.

Read Full Post »

 

This is  a great way to morph leftover Yuba Asada into a new dish or to forge ahead and simply create this one on its own.  I grew up in southern California and machaca burritos were sold at nearly every Mexican food restaurant.  As a result, I grew to love them but since they contain egg and shredded beef,  as a vegan,  I figured that I was outta luck forever until I actually gave this dilemma some thought.  This is what I came up with and it satisfied my tastes entirely. 

 

Vegan Machaca

Ingredients:

 yuba asada [I used leftovers and I’d estimate that there were 2 cups of yuba asada used in this recipe.]

1 block of firm tofu, crumbled into bite-sized pieces

juice of half a lemon

1 green bell pepper, large dice

1/2 an onion, large dice

2 canned green chiles, large dice

1-2 T canola or peanut oil

1/2-1 tsp annatto seeds [The amount depends upon the amount of oil to flavor/color.]

2 tsp dried Mexican oregano

Garnishes:  chopped tomato, sliced green onion, cilantro

Directions:

Add oil to a large sauté pan or wok and bring to a medium low-medium heat.  Toss in the annatto seeds and cook for about 5 minutes until the oil is both flavored and colored.  Remove seeds and discard.  [Annatto will give the dish a unique latin flavor as well as a saffron-hued color.]

Turn up the heat a bit and add onion and bell pepper and sauté until softened.  Add in green chiles and the tofu and mix well.  Cook until the moisture from the tofu has evaporated.  Add the oregano and lemon juice and then the yuba asada.  Continute cooking until the yuba is hot.

Serve with warm corn tortillas and garnishes.

Read Full Post »

Meatless Mondays… and Tuesdays and then the rest of the work week is just WTF [literally], so why eat meat at all?  Clearly, we have already made the leap and adopted an entirely vegan lifestyle, but the reality that is dawning upon me is that I don’t think most people realize that there are food options outside of meat-centered meals.  That is why we have decided to jump aboard the Meatless Monday bandwagon and help contribute to its success and awareness to affect change.

I am a firm proponent of taking control of what you eat.  Personally, I don’t want industrially-processed substances that have been purposefully treated with chemicals engineered specifically in order to ring all the bells and blow all the whistles of human sensory organs.  It is manipulation, and it is wrong.  If Americans knew what it is that they actually eat and regard as food, they would be horrified.  At least I hope they would be; we certainly were/are.

Regardless of the ethics of the matter, Americans consume far too much meat.  It is affecting our environment and our collective health as a nation.  When elective surgical procedures that rearrange one’s digestive system become the norm,  yet eating five to nine servings of fruits and vegetables daily is considered extreme, something has clearly gone diabolically wrong.  It is time to step up and accept responsibility for ourselves and to take a good long look at how our actions and whims affect our health and our planet.  The least anyone could do is to abstain from consuming an animal one day of the week.  Please, spread the word and encourage those you know to support Meatless Monday.  Awareness coupled with action is a powerful thing.

***

Yuba Asada

Yuba is also referred to as dried bean curd or dried bean curd sticks.  You can also sometimes find it as bean curd knots, which are very nice to use.  It is easily found in an Asian market and is worth the side-trip to have some on hand.

Ingredients:

1 package yuba, rehydrated in warm water until soft and then cut into 1/4 inch shreds [If you have knots rather than sticks, there is no need to cut, simply use whole.]

Juice and zest of one lemon, lime, orange and grapefruit

2 T cumin

2 T chili powder

1½ tsp dried oregano

1½ tsp ground coriander

5 garlic cloves, crushed

¼ cup soy sauce

2 jalapenos or one habanero [If you like it hotter], seeds and ribs removed and sliced thinly

1 onion, thinly sliced

Directions:

Place all ingredients into a zip lock bag or other container and add the yuba. [I prefer a bag because it’s easy to move the ingredients around occasionally to ensure it’s well marinaded.]

The following day, drain off the liquid in a colander.  Heat a bit of canola oil over medium –high heat and add the yuba asada.  Stir-fry until the liquid has evaporated and the yuba begins to brown.

Serve with black beans, pan-fried potatoes and some warmed corn tortillas.  Garnish with fresh cilantro, avocado, tomatoes and roasted garlic cloves.

Read Full Post »

 

Crispy Yuba with Matchstick Vegetables

Ingredients:

4 sticks dried bean curd [yuba], rehydrated, patted dry and cut into shreds

2 celery sticks, cut into matchsticks

2 carrots, cut into matchsticks

1 red bell pepper,  cut into matchsticks

1 yellow bell pepper, cut into matchsticks

1 broccoli stalk, outer fibrous layer peeled off and cut into matchsticks

4 cloves garlic, sliced

2 inches ginger, minced

1/3 cup cornstarch seasoned with salt and pepper

Sauce:

4 T ponzu sauce [without bonito, could use soy or tamari as substitute]

1 T rice wine vinegar

1 T sake

2 T agave syrup

1/2 T chili garlic sauce [or more, depending on how spicy you like your food]

1/3 cup water

Directions:

Toss the yuba with the cornstarch and add to a wok-style pan on medium high heat with a coating of canola oil.  Cook until the yuba has browned edges and is crisped up.  Remove the yuba and set aside.  Add another drizzle of oil if needed and sequentially cook the vegetables in the following order and then set aside with the yuba:  carrots, broccoli stalks, celery, peppers.  Add the ginger and garlic to the pan and cook briefly.  Add the sauce mixture.  Return the cooked items to the pan and coat with the sauce.  Give it enough time in the pan so that the cornstarch on the yuba interacts with the sauce and thickens it a bit.  Serve immediately over brown basmati rice.

The next day I tossed in some fresh spinach –to get my greens fix– while reheating and had a great lunch.  The yuba softens and loses it’s crispy texture after being in the fridge overnight but I happen to love the texture of yuba in any incarnation.  It’s really become one of my favorite foods.

Read Full Post »